Oem technical notes

SELF ALIGNING RELEASE BEARINGS  

Most late model applications are supplied with self-aligning (SA) release bearings. The main purpose of the self-aligning release bearing is to help eliminate premature bearing wear and failure due to slight misalignments between the engine and the transmission. A slight gap between the inner race and collar allow the bearing to move slightly about on the collar. This movement will allow the bearing to find its own center on the clutch fingers, resulting in better alignment and reduced wear. SELF-ALIGNING BEARINGS MAY APPEAR OFF CENTER IF VIEWED FROM THE BEARING SIDE. IF YOU CAN MANUALLY MOVE THE BEARING ABOUT ON THE COLLAR, YOU HAVE A SELF-ALIGNING BEARING.

HONDA APPLICATIONS


FLYWHEEL RESURFACING

Always have the flywheel machined to the proper factory specification. Due to the recessed flywheels used in many Honda applications, material must be removed from the clutch mounting surface in the same amount as is removed from the friction surface. This is known as the 'step'. Failure to do this will result in erratic or non-release situations.

CLUTCH CHATTER, HARD PEDAL

Cross shaft release fork equipped Hondas tend to develop problems over time. Wear on the bosses machined into the transmission case where the cross shaft rides can cause the shaft to stick or bind. The cross shaft may also become out of alignment and cause the release bearing to ride unevenly on the clutch fingers causing clutch chatter, uneven release, and binding. All release components must be carefully inspected and replaced if worn.

OUT OF BALANCE VIBRATION

If the clutch exhibits an out of balance condition, check for worn inner CV joints.

INPUT SHAFT PLAY

Some Honda models do not come equipped with pilot bushings. This situation may cause excessive pressure to the bearings in the transmission. Over time, the input shaft will run out, causing stress to the clutch disc and hub assembly. THIS IS A MAJOR CAUSE OF DISC FAILURES IN HONDA APPLICATIONS.

CLUTCH CABLE PROBLEMS

Extremely hard pedal effort on some 84-87 Honda cars may be caused by a problem with the accelerator pedal bracket. A welded bracket located on the accelerator pedal utilizes a tube through which the clutch cable is routed. These brackets are known to break off, leaving no support for the clutch cable. This will cause binding and hard pedal feel. Visually inspect these components if a hard or binding pedal is encountered.

FORD/FORD TRUCK


1752SAR RELEASE BEARING - TAURUS SHO, TEMPO, TOPAZ, ESCORT

This release bearing contains a steel repair sleeve that fits over the original aluminum quill. The factory quill is prone to galling which will cause the pedal to fluctuate in stiffness and cause erratic release.

SELF-ADJUSTING CLUTCH CABLES

Many Ford vehicles use a self-adjusting ratchet mechanism that is attached to the clutch pedal under the dash. When installing a new clutch, this mechanism must be reset so that proper pedal height and release will be attained. Pull the pedal all the way up, then release the pawl from the gear quadrant to the pedal swings free. Let the pedal return and let go of the pawl. Cycle the pedal several time to allow the ratchet mechanism to set itself.

BRONCO II AND RANGER HYDRAULIC RELEASE BEARING

1784-87 trucks using the 1738SA release bearing contain a new style bearing that may be different from the original. When replacing this bearing, the steel sleeve located in the original slave assembly MUST BE REMOVED or the bearing will not sit flat on the slave cylinder, causing the bearing to ride the clutch fingers and the clutch to slip.

PREMATURE FAILURE OF SLAVE CYLINDER ON 93-95 F SERIES TRUCKS

Ford trucks equipped with 7.3L IDI, IDI turbo, DI turbo diesel, or 7.5 gas engines may experience premature failure of the slave cylinder due to extreme exhaust heat. Ford offers replacement parts for this problem including a slave cylinder heat shield.

GM


RELEASE BEARING INSTALLATION - 1716SA

The most common installation error on GM vehicles with stamped clutch forks is installing the release bearing improperly. The front of the stamped fork AND the spring clips must both sit between the flanges of the release bearing. Failure to do so can cause non-release, erratic release, bearing failure, and broken release bearings.

HYUNDAI


EXCEL - when replacing the clutch in these vehicles it is imperative to inspect the roll pins that hold the release bearing fork to the cross shaft. These pins often break or bend, causing release problems. Change these pins on any clutch replacement for this application.

JEEP


HYDRAULIC RELEASE MECHANISM PROBLEMS

When troubleshooting release problems on Jeeps using an external slave cylinder, check the plastic pivot at the end of the slave cylinder rod for cracks. This part is prone to cracking or complete breakage resulting in non-release of the clutch.

NISSAN


MAXIMA - Always check the transmission quill/collar for this application for wear or galling. This problem can cause the release bearing to bind or stick when the pedal is released, and can cause damage to the other components such as the clutch or transmission. Replace this collar if worn or galled.

PONTIAC


FIERO RELEASE PROBLEMS

A common cause of release problems with Fieros is due to the release shaft lever. The original lever is made of stamped steel and is prone to flexing and breaking. This problem will surface as the clutch will not fully release or the transmission will drag while shifting, and may seem as though the slave cylinder is bad or the hydraulic system will not bleed properly. GM offers a replacement lever made of cast steel that will solve the problem.